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SAY HELLO TO THE ERA OF FACT-BASED GOLF TRAINING

The Kansas City Golf Academy proudly uses HACKMOTION 3D Sensors to measure, analyze and track our players wrist positions throughout their entire swing. This gives our players instant and direct feedback, taking the guesswork out of trying to optimize their swing. 

Why is this so important? 

You probably already know that clubface control is the ultimate control of your ball.

In fact, more than 80% of golf ball's initial direction is determined by the clubface.

To improve ball flight, many coaches focus on aligning the player’s body position without paying that much attention to the wrists.


However, your hands are the only part of the body which is in direct contact with the club.

Meaning that your wrist alignment directly determines the clubface angle.

We know how important it is to measure wrist movement, which is why we use HACKMOTION.

HACKMOTION provides us with the tool so that we can help our players find the necessary adjustments to the wrist position for an improved ball flight.

The fact is, to play consistent golf you need to achieve consistent contact of the clubface and the ball. The clubface angle determines more than 80% of the ball flight direction, according to launch monitor data and your wrists directly control the club face angle.

Therefore, learning to measure and optimize wrist angles and wrist motion is basically a shortcut to better golf.

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Understanding Swing Dynamics

Wrist Extension/Flexion Is What Opens and Closes the Club Face

Wrist extending (cupping/bending) and flexing (bowing/arching) are the motions which open and close the club face. Extension opens the clubface, flexion closes the clubface. The better you control the amount of flexion/extension you have the better you will control the clubface and shot direction.

The most common problem for amateurs is having too much wrist extension at the top and during the downswing which leads to open clubface and slicing.

Radial/Ulnar Deviation Is The Amount of Wrist Cock

Radial/Ulnar deviation is often called cocking and uncocking motion and is an important power source.  However it is also one of the most misunderstood parts of the swing because on video it sometimes looks like tour players are adding a lot of wrist cock during downswing. Many amateur players try to copy it and add wrist cock by force hoping that they will increase their lag and distance.

However 3D wrist data shows that most tour players are not adding massive amounts of wrist cock during downswing and many of them are actually keeping it constant or decreasing it. This happens because radial/ulnar deviation is “coupled” motion with extension/flexion. The more you add radial deviation, the more the wrist also extends which opens the clubface and makes it harder to control it.

Rotation Is Important For Squaring the Club Face

Rotation is one of the key motions which is responsible for closing the clubface as it approaches impact with the ball. Too little rotation before impact can leave the clubface open and result in slices and pushes to the right. Too much rotation will close the clubface and result in pulling the ball left.

HACKMOTION sensor’s 3D data shows that tour players are rotating through impact quite a lot, instead of the belief that they have minimum amount of rotation. The big difference is that they do it consistently – repeating the same amount of rotation which is matched up with the amount of flexion/extension they have (which also squares the clubface).

 

Using the HACKMOTION sensor with our players gives us the ability to track the amount of rotation they have and help keep them consistent from swing to swing to improve the consistency of their swing.

So whether you're looking for a complete swing overhaul or a simple maintenance check on your current swing, The Kansas City Golf Academy provides players with the very best solution for your golfing needs in the Midwest.

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